My Digital Garden

dotnet-tools

.Net Tools

Summary

These look like an interesting approach to creating Personal Software Tools. Although they rely on having the .Net SDK installed, as that is cross-platform, these tools can also be used cross-platform on Windows, Mac and Linux.

Link to source

Note captured: 08/07/2022

Bookmark created: 08/07/2022

See also

dotnet-local-tool

Highlights from source page

A .NET tool is a special NuGet package that contains a console application. A tool can be installed on your machine in the following ways:

  • As a global tool The tool binaries are installed in a default directory that is added to the PATH environment variable. You can invoke the tool from any directory on the machine without specifying its location. One version of a tool is used for all directories on the machine.
  • As a global tool in a custom location (also known as a tool-path tool).
    The tool binaries are installed in a location that you specify. You can invoke the tool from the installation directory or by providing the directory with the command name or by adding the directory to the PATH environment variable. One version of a tool is used for all directories on the machine.
  • As a local tool (applies to .NET Core SDK 3.0 and later).
    The tool binaries are installed in a default directory. You invoke the tool from the installation directory or any of its subdirectories. Different directories can use different versions of the same tool.
    The .NET CLI uses manifest files to keep track of which tools are installed as local to a directory. When the manifest file is saved in the root directory of a source code repository, a contributor can clone the repository and invoke a single .NET CLI command that installs all of the tools listed in the manifest files.

.NET tools run in full trust. Do not install a .NET tool unless you trust the author.

Here are some ways to find tools: